I have a confession, I am closet Cupper!

I think this seems weird to say this, but I love getting cupped. What is cupping you ask, and why do I love it so much? Cupping is a treatment that creates a partial vacuum on the skin using glass or plastic suction cups. You usually will feel a tight sensation in the area of the cup. Depending on your comfort the cups may be moved around or left in place. They may remain on your body briefly or for longer amounts of time. Each treatment is unique depending upon what is going on with you that day. The most common area that is cupped is the back, but the cups work well on other areas.

The suction that is created by the cups increases blood and energy flow to the area, and relieves tension and tightness. The increase of circulation facilitates localized healing. Cupping relieves pain by opening up the meridians, or energy channels, of the body and improving energy flow to every organ and tissue of the body.

For me personally, when life gets stressful and intense (which is often), my whole body tightens, especially my shoulders and neck. Even my head feels tight, almost like I am on the verge of getting a headache. Cupping seems to provide instant relief and similar to a therapeutic massage I feel my whole body release and the tightness melts away. I find getting cupping on a regular basis, especially if I have a lot on my plate, releases my tension and allows me to continue to keep living life at a high level.

Cupping has numerous benefits — it can help remove toxins from the body and stimulate the flow of fresh blood, lymph, and stagnant energy throughout the body. It often works wonders for patients with the flu, colds, coughs, back and muscle pain, poor circulation, anxiety, allergies, fevers, aches and myriad other pains.
I will warn you that cupping will leave bruises, but they are temporary. The bruising typically goes away within 3-5 days. In addition, the session can be relaxing, but at times the cups can feel uncomfortable as they are moved around the skin. BUT, that means the cups are doing their job, the more tense you are, the more intense the cupping can be, if you are new to cupping the therapist with typically ease you in. Some of our massage therapists can add cupping to your massage session. I personally, love seeing our Acupuncturists. They incorporate cupping, acupuncture and bodywork all in one session, but I am also a huge fan of Acupuncture, I find it to be extremely effective for me on many levels.

In addition to regular cupping, there is also fire cupping and blood cupping. I have not tried either of these, so I cannot personally speak to their benefits. If you are like me, and feel like your body gets tight during times of stress, I would high recommend you give cupping a try.

To cupping and your health,

Aromatherapy for Everyday Health

essential-oils-header

Acupuncturist-GabriellaDifferent factors we face in daily life have an impact on our overall well-being. Whether dealing with a child who needs individual care, a friend frustrated with school, a spouse with stress from work, or a teenager worn out from sporting practice, an Aroma Therapy session can help.  The specific oils used in combination with human touch provide multiple benefits that include:

  • Decreasing stress
  • Boosting immunity
  • Supporting healing by reducing inflammation
  • Energizing and supporting homeostasis

This safe and effective technique uses only the safest and cleanest quality essential oils that are both potent and pure with the appropriate chemistry for positive benefits.  Try an Aroma Therapy treatment for personal care or gift a session to someone you love.

Book an Aroma Therapy sessions Gabriella Rivera, L.Ac. today and experience the life changing power of essential oils.

CALL 303-357-9355 TO BOOK

Cupping for Athletes and Weekend Warriors in Denver

Cupping, an ancient healing tool that has been traced back to ancient Egypt, China, Europe, Africa and Native American cultures and has gained worldwide attention after Michael Phelps, United States Gold Medal Olympic swimmer, swam in the 2016 Rio Olympics with circular bruise marks on his back and shoulder, caused by cupping. 36FE14F900000578-0-image-a-12_1470640774760

Phelps has been using this therapy technique to help his muscles recover and perform at their best. It involves a therapist heating small glass cups, then placing them on the skin and pulling them from the body to loosen and relax the muscles.

Michael Phelps is a firm believer in the power of cupping, “Our bodies are going to hurt after doing this for so long. It’s the best thing that I’ve ever had. It has saved me from a lot of pain.”

What is cupping?

The treatment creates a partial vacuum on the skin using cups. The result is a suction that increases blood and energy flow to the area. The increase of circulation facilitates localized healing. Cupping relieves pain is by opening up the meridians, or energy channels, of the body and improving energy flow to every organ and tissue of the body. Cupping also triggers body tissues to release toxins and activates the lymphatic system which helps to alleviate aches and pains.

The cupping process:

Glass cups are fitted with a valve that attaches to a small hand-operated pump, allowing the practitioner to suck out air without having to rely on fire to depressurize the cup first. It also gives them greater control over the amount of suction. The modern name for cupping is baguanfa or suction cup therapy.

In order to allow the cups to move over the skin easily, oil is used. Oils that have been infused with extracts of medicinal herbs are particularly useful. The cups are applied at room temperature, and there is some friction generated with moving cups, causing a small but significant amount of heat, especially if a warming oil is also used.

Cups are generally left in place for ten minutes although the time can range from five to fifteen minutes. The skin will redden due to the congestion of blood flow and some bruising on the skin is to be expected.

What can cupping relieve?

This natural treatment isn’t only great for general body aches, pain, and stress. Cupping can be an excellent noninvasive treatment for:

  • Acute pain such as sprains and strains
  • Dull aches and pains, arthritis
  • Edema and swellings
  • Respiratory issues like asthma, chronic cough, and bronchitis
  • Abdominal pain, stomachache and indigestion
  • Painful menstruation and associated low back pain
  • Coughs from excessive mucus

The Wellness Center is your premier place for getting cupping in Denver.  We can work with you to create the perfect treatment plan based on your unique needs and lifestyle.  Cupping can be done is just a 30 minute session with one of our skilled practitioners.

If you are interested in booking a cupping session, you can book with any of the following Denver cupping therapists:

Acupuncturists: Dr. Shwu-Yar Tsai and Gabriella Rivera, L.Ac

Chiropractor: Dr. Tim Price

Massage Therapists: Amie Kern, CMT, Linda Moiseyev, CMT and Shannon McFall – Michelson, CMT

Cupping Therapy for Pain in Denver

 

Fire cupping cups on back of female patient in Acupuncture therapy

Pain can be one of the most difficult experiences to manage and treat. Many times a person with chronic pain will need to try several different modalities before finding something that works. If you’re interested in natural, alternative therapies for pain you’ll want to be aware of the Chinese therapy called Cupping. This therapy has been around for thousands of years and isn’t widely known about in the western world but is gaining in popularity.

 

What is cupping?
Cupping can be traced to ancient Egypt over 3000 years ago and in today’s world is practiced in Traditional Chinese Medicine. The treatment creates a partial vacuum on the skin using cups. The result is a suction that increases blood and energy flow to the area. The increase of circulation facilitates localized healing.

The way Cupping relieves pain is by opening up the meridians, or energy channels, of the body and improving energy flow to every organ and tissue of the body. Cupping also triggers body tissues to release toxins and activates the lymphatic system which helps to alleviate aches and pains.

 

The cupping process:
Glass cups are generally used for cupping, although bamboo cups are also used. Glass cups are fitted with a valve that attaches to a small hand-operated pump, allowing the practitioner to suck out air without having to rely on fire to depressurize the cup first. It also gives them greater control over the amount of suction. The modern name for cupping is baguanfa or suction cup therapy.

In order to allow the cups to move over the skin easily, oil is used. Oils that have been infused with extracts of medicinal herbs are particularly useful. The cups are applied at room temperature, and there is some friction generated with moving cups, causing a small but significant amount of heat, especially if a warming oil is also used.

Cups are generally left in place for ten minutes although the time can range from five to fifteen minutes. The skin will redden due to the congestion of blood flow. The cup is removed from the skin by pressing the skin on one side, allowing some outside air to enter and thus equalise the pressure. Some bruising on the skin where the rim of the cup is to be expected.

 

What can cupping relieve?
This natural treatment isn’t only great for back pain, Cupping can be an excellent noninvasive treatment of:

  • Body pain including but not limited to knee pain, elbow pain, back and neck pain, pain in the legs, low back pain, hand pain
  • Acute pain such as sprains and strains
  • Dull aches and pains, arthritis
  • Edema and swellings
  • Respiratory issues like asthma, chronic cough, and bronchitis
  • Abdominal pain, stomachache and indigestion
  • Painful menstruation and associated low back pain
  • Coughs from excessive mucus

If you struggle with any of the above ailments it may be time to give Cupping a try. The Wellness Center’s Dr. Tim Price and Dr. Shwu-Yar Tsai both offer Cupping in Denver and can work with you to create the perfect treatment plan. Schedule your appointment today.

 

Article References:
http://www.wellnessdenver.com/acupuncture/cupping-alternative-therapy-for-back-pain/

http://www.wellnessdenver.com/uncategorized/cupping-ancient-healing-tools-are-making-a-comeback/

http://www.naturaltherapypages.com.au/natural_medicine/Cupping#ixzz3kVXHBELZ

Reduce Recurrences of UTI and Stablize your Life

Do you ever wonder how you can stop recurring UTIs (Urinary Tract Infections)?

Written by Dr. Shwu Tsai (Acupuncturist) and Ryan Katz (client).

 

Since World War II, antibiotics have been a safe and successful treatment of eliminating bacterial infections. The problem, however, is that antibiotics don’t necessarily prevent bacterial infections from returning.

If you suffer from recurrent Urinary Tract Infections commonly referred to as UTIs , you know what it’s like to have an unstable quality of life. You may even feel helpless at times.

But there’s hope!

Though this post is not about a magical cure, it is about Chinese medicine includes herbs and acupuncture – an effective combination that offers relief, reduces the frequency of recurrences, and stabilizes of the quality of life of those who suffer from recurrent UTI.

So, here’s a little background on UTIs just so we’re on the same page:

A UTI occurs when a bacteria infection is located in and affects the urinary tract. The infection can cause frequent urges to urinate, a burning sensation when urinating, back pain, abdominal pain, and/or cloudy, dark urine.

Sounds familiar. Right?

According to Chinese Medicine theory, there are most likely two reasons you may frequently experience recurrences:

1) Your diet and lifestyle may promote infection.

2) The bacteria adapt and come back in a different form.

Because of these reasons, when acupuncturists diagnose patterns, such as recurrent UTI, they not only offer suggestions of dietary and other lifestyle modifications, but they also treat for an adapted strain of UTI called a Non-Infection UTI. Here is a list of diets that can help you start living a healthy life.

Here’s a little background on that:

Non-Infection UTI commonly affects the elderly and those with recurrent UTI infections. It affects more women than men, and, like any UTI, it can be a chronic condition that ranges from mild discomfort to severe pain as a result of bladder pressure, bladder pain, and sometimes even pelvic pain (Mayo Clinic).

The trouble with a Non-Infection UTI is that it drastically varies in symptoms and severity, and because there are no signs of detectable bacteria, the Mayo clinic confirms that there is no known cure for Non-Infection UTI in Western Medicine.

I know…this doesn’t sound too pleasant. But stay with me…

According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, a Non-Infection UTI is safely referred to as IC/PBS – a combination of the phrases “Interstitial Cystitis” (IC) and “Painful Bladder Syndrome” (PBS) – because it covers any and all symptoms of a Non-Infection UTI.

Chinese Medicine uses the term IC/PBS as a reference to both the inflammation of the Lower Burner System (kidneys, ureter, bladder, and urethra) and the pattern of unsuccessful and painful excretion of urine from the body.

So, here’s where the hope is:

Tapping in acupuncture needleChinese medicine: both herbal formula and acupuncture recognizes that most symptoms of IC/PBS are a result of underlying health problems; therefore, a comprehensive diagnosis is compiled and takes into account the individual’s body, mind, and spirit with the purpose of building the body’s immune system.

And here’s the cool needle part:

By inserting thin, sterile, stainless steel needles, acupuncturists also re-organize(?) pathways of energy (called Meridians). As a result, your body’s natural immune response is mobilized and YOU will be capable of living with a much more consistent quality of life!

To secure a fruitful diagnosis and a positive experience, The Wellness Center hosts one of the most highly recommended acupuncturists: Dr. Shwu-Yar Tsai. Or, as her patients call her, Dr. Sue!

Dr. Tsai has a PH.D. in Nutritional Pathophysiology from Texas Tech, a Masters of Science of Oriental Medicine from the Southwest Acupuncture College, a National Certification in Oriental Medicine, and published works in the field of Nutrition, Cellular Biochemistry, and Behavior Genetics.

Dr. Tsai works closely with patients in order to diagnose any patterns in the Lower Burner and treat the symptoms with acupuncture, recommendations of dietary and lifestyle adjustments, various Tui Na techniques, Moxibustion, and Herbal Remedies. Click on the link above to read some of the magnificent testimonials and about her other areas of expertise. If I may say so myself, she’s as top-tier as her recommendations suggest!

There is hope!  Call The Wellness Center: 303-357-9355 to set up a consultation with Dr. Shwu to see if she can help you stop recurring UTIs.

 

Acupuncture – Pre and Post-Surgery

acupunctureAcupuncture is a modality used to treat many ailments and diseases, as well as help the body heal after trauma, excessive stress or injuries. Because surgery is a form of trauma and injury to the body, acupuncture treatment can be utilized to reduce pain and more. The process of acupuncture is rather simple. Very fine needles are applied to specific points on the body to release energy, and the main goals of acupuncture are to target key points in the central nervous system and to stabilize or balance the body system.

If you have any surgical procedure, it is important to take care of your body before and after the procedure. Pre and post-operative acupuncture uses the concept of whole-body balancing to reduce stress and promote healing of injuries.

After surgery, you will often find that your muscles and joints are sore, and this pain and fatigue can last through the recovery period. Your body will need a few weeks to heal. This is the best time for acupuncture to release you from this pain and fatigue, and re-balance your body without having to rely totally on painkillers. Remember: you do have options, and acupuncture is one of the best ways to prepare and recover from surgery.

 

Benefits of pre and post operative acupuncture:

1. Prepares the body for surgery by eliminating pre-existing symptoms and strengthening whole-body circulation.

2. Increases the supply of blood and nutrition to muscles and other tissues so that it speeds up post-surgical trauma healing.

3. Promotes free flow of blood and energy to tissues i.e. unblock meridian(s) which may be blocked as a result of surgical procedure(s).

4. Removes toxins and cellular waste from tissues after surgery.

5. Increases local circulation of blood and lymph to hasten recovery rate.

6. Reduces stress due to pain and relaxes the body so that recovery can be focused on surgical areas.

7. Reduces symptoms of trauma and increases whole body balancing.

 

For more information, please contact Shwu-Yar “Sue” Tsai, Ph.D., L.Ac. at The Wellness Center – 303-357-9355

 

Beat the Cold and Flu Season with Chinese Medicine

Autumn is here! The change seems to have happened overnight. The morning air is crisp and the days are shorter. You may find yourself a little more focused and serious than during the carefree days of summer. Fall is the time of year to prepare for the cold months of winter and to reflect on the year that has past.

According to Chinese medicine, fall belongs to the Metal element and corresponds with the lungs which control the entire respiratory system. The elegance in Chinese medicine is that it respects and observes the changes of the seasons and provides us with guiding principles to harmonize our energy with that of our environment. Autumn is thought to be the time of year that the lungs are most susceptible to illness due to the dry, cold air and thus is the time for us to focus on respiratory health and reinforce or rebalance one’s Metal energy.

THE LUNGS
Our lungs enable us to take in fresh air, from which we generate “qi” (or “life energy”) while we exhale toxins, stress and the pent up emotions that can weigh us down. Like the season, which bridges the warm months of summer to the cold of winter, the lungs bridge our interior and exterior environments. The lungs have a great deal of responsibility when it comes to maintaining optimal health; they provide the first line of defense against external pathogens, such as viruses and bacteria that cause common respiratory issues.

Our lung qi dictates the strength of our immune system. When lung qi is strong, our immune system is efficient and our body has sufficient energy to tend to daily tasks; however, when lung qi is weak, we are more susceptible to catching colds, asthma attacks, allergies, general fatigue, sore throats, coughing, shortness of breath, respiratory and sinus infections and the accumulation of mucous.

METAL
With the arrival of fall and cooler temperatures, there is a natural sadness that many people experience. Greif is the emotion of the lungs and Metal element. The Metal energy is responsible for characteristics such as integrity, structure, personal boundaries, logical thinking and meticulous work. If you are a Metal dominate person, you are someone that is honorable and truthful; people know exactly where they stand with you. You do not like chaos or conflict, but prefer order and control .You tend to be a perfectionist and are most likely an expert in your career.

Because the mind and body are inseparable, when our qi is blocked we can experience imbalance both physically and mentally. You may feel sadness or grief more often. It may become hard to express yourself. Perfectionist tendencies can lead to disappointment or a critical self-image. What was once structure, becomes obstinate rigidity.

YOUR HEALTH
During this season, take some time to observe your physical and mental well-being. If you’ve been feeling a little out of sorts or have simply put off taking care of yourself, don’t hesitate to come in for a consultation with one of our licensed acupuncturists to find out how Chinese medicine can help you regain and optimize your health!

NATURAL REMEDIES

Pears
Researchers in the Netherlands have found that apples and pears may help protect the lungs from chronic disease. According to Chinese medicine, pears specifically help moisten and strengthen the Lungs.

Flax Tea with Honey
This tea moisturizes the Lungs, expels phlegm and calms cough. Flax is also anti-inflammatory and a natural laxative.

1 Tbsp whole flax – ground in coffee grinder or mortar and pedestal
1 tsp honey

Pour 1 cup boiling water over flax seeds and allow to steep 10 minutes. Strain and add honey.

Miso with Turnips and Tremella Mushrooms
Turnips strengthen the Lungs while Tremella help preserve the natural moisture of the Lungs.

Sesame oil
Turnips diced
Tremella Mushrooms (can be bought online or Asian markets)
1 dallop of miso paste
Vegetable stock

Heat oil, add turnips, and cook until soft. Add turnip greens and mushrooms. Add miso and vegetable stock. Simmer until turnips and mushrooms are cooked through.

Interview with Acupuncturist and Massage Therapist Michelle Leno

What inspired you to be an acupuncturist?
Michelle grew up in Korea during the early years of her life. It was during this time that she became acquainted with Oriental medicine, as her parents took advantage of the traditional healing modalities offered. However, it wasn’t until her experience during 9.11 that she found her way to becoming a practitioner.

Michelle was living in New York City and working for a financial company during her mid-twenties. The day the towers fell, she, like most of those working in Manhattan, was sent home from work. Because all transportation had been stopped, Michelle made her way back to Brooklyn on foot. As she crossed the Manhattan Bridge with thousands of other people she realized then that life was too short to spend at a job that offered no fulfillment. Within days she decided that she wanted to go into a field where she could help people.

With her undergraduate degrees in fine art and psychology, she was enthralled by the elegance of Chinese medicine and how it relates to both the psychological and physical person.

Today Michelle is thrilled with her choice. She enjoys the challenge of helping people find ways to improve their health while maintaining their quality of life. She understands that life is a balance and each person requires weight in different areas.
 
How long have you been practicing?
Michelle graduated from Pacific College of Oriental Medicine in Chicago in December of 2006 and ran her private practice in Chicago for 3 years before moving to Denver in June of this year.
 
Do you have a specialty?
Michelle specializes in pain management, women’s health issues, and problems with digestion.
She finds that acupuncture is very useful for conditions that western medicine offer no solutions for; specifically Irritable Bowel Syndrome, emotional disharmony, and problems with menstruation and hormone regulation.
 
Any hobbies or interests?
Michelle likes to read and cook. She prefers books that take place in the 17th and 18th century. When she reads, she wants the story to be free of cell phones and computers. One of her favorite stories is The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexander Dumas.
She and her finance cook a lot of vegetarian food. She enjoys finding recipes that are simple and clean. She uses a lot of fresh vegetables and herbs from the farmers markets and has a weakness for stinky cheeses.

What can a client expect on their first treatment?
With most initial clients, Michelle likes to have a detailed discussion about the primary health concern and past medical history. During this discussion you and Michelle will talk about everything from your digestion to subjective body temperature. Once you’ve covered all the important signs and symptoms, she’ll ask you to move onto the table so she can on palpate your abdomen, assess your pulse and examine your tongue to further help her in establishing a diagnosis and choosing the corresponding treatment.

The needle insertion should not be painful; however, you may experience some pressure or a heavy sensation at the points being treated. An average treatment includes about 14-30 needles, depending on the condition and once these are inserted, you’ll be allowed to rest and retain the needles for about 30 minutes.

What are other modalities that you may incorporate into a session?
As well as being a licensed acupuncturist, Michelle is also certified massage therapist. She incorporates Asian body work and massage into her treatments, especially those that focus on pain management.

Michelle also likes to use both cupping and gua sha in many of her treatments. Cupping is a method of treatment in which a partial vacuum is generated in a cup, which is then applied directly to the skin. The underlying tissue is drawn up into the cup – creating in a specific area to bring up “sha,” or what is considered to be “stagnation” in Chinese Medicine. Raising sha promotes circulation and improves the metabolic process. This is an effective modality useful for chronic and acute pain as well as helping to treat the common cold and mucous production.
Gua Sha is a healing technique that involves repeated and pressured scrapping over the skin with a smooth edged instrument. This modality of “friction-stroking” causes “sha” to surface in order to release stagnation. Like cupping, gua sha promotes the flow of energy, blood circulation, lymph fluids and assists in the removal of toxins from the body. After either gua sha or cupping treatment, patients often feel immediate relief.

To read more on Michelle click here.

Needling a Cold

The immune system protects the body from potentially harmful substances by recognizing and responding to antigens (molecules on the surface of) cells, viruses, fungi, or bacteria, as well as nonliving substances such as toxins, chemicals, drugs, and foreign particles. This complex system involves specialized cells (such as T-cells, B cells, macrophages and others) that recognize and destroy these foreign entities or antigens. Unfortunately the lifestyle of most American’s today does not support proper immune function because of lack of sleep, poor nutrition/diet, too much stress, not enough rest/relaxation, AND exposure to germs and viruses in crowded places like schools and offices. There are a number of alternative ways to increase immunity, especially in cold/flu season. Naturopathy offers great solutions, and acupuncture is also an effective way to enhance immune function.

How does it work?
Acupuncture uses needles to stimulate the flow and movement of qi (energy) through the body’s energy pathways or meridians. When there is a blockage of any kind, the body is not in balance and can’t function properly (i.e. digestion issues, pain or impaired immunity). The needling of specific acupuncture points and their subsequent effect on the nervous system relax the body, help a person sleep and promote healthy digestion all of which support a healthy immune system.
According to a paper presented at the 5th World Congress of Acupuncture in 2002, acupuncture affects immunity in the following ways:
– Acupuncture elevates levels of white blood cells, specific hormones, prostaglandins, gamma-globulins, antibodies and opsonins – all of which support the immune process.
– Acupuncture constricts and dilates blood vessels, promoting the body’s release of vasodilators (known as histamines) that increase the inflammatory response that protects the body
– Acupuncture elevates the levels of neurotransmitters, specifically serotonin and noradrenaline that support sleep, mood, and cell regeneration – all of which balances our bodies communication systems.
– Acupuncture activates the secretions of endorphins, specifically enkaphalins that ask as pain killers

In addition, a group of scientists recently did a study on acupuncture’s effectiveness to attenuate stress and stimulate lymphocyte proliferation (white blood cells, specifically T-cells that are responsible for cell-mediated immunity) in the elderly (Neuroscience Letters, 2010). The result showed that acupuncture was able to significantly reduce depression, anxiety and stress. The intervention also increased T-cell proliferation, directly increasing the amount and action of white blood cells.

Moxibustion is also a powerful tool in the acupuncture repertoire that aids in immunity support. Moxibustion is a heat therapy that involves the use of mugwort, an herb that is applied topically on acupuncture points. Moxibustion has been shown in studies to increase white blood cell count in chemotherapy patients and other cases of immune weakness. For patients with recurring infections and colds, moxibustion is an excellent technique for naturally bolstering immunity.

In conclusion, acupuncture and its accompanying techniques are powerful forces for supporting the immune system as well as fighting illness and disease.

Cupping: Alternative Therapy for Back Pain

It is high time to get your garden prepped and planted, put in some new bedding flowers, or dig up that unsightly tree that didn’t make it through the Winter. All of these chores are fun, but are also hard work and can leave you sore (and sun burnt) the next day. Back pain and gardening go hand and hand unfortunately, BUT there are many remedies for spending a day bent over digging in the dirt. One that may not be on your radar screen is called Cupping Therapy.

What is Cupping Therapy?
Cupping is an ancient therapy that can be traced back to Egypt over 3000 years ago. In modern times it is known as a Traditional Chinese Medicine technique for treating a variety of health conditions – predominately pain. Basically a partial vacuum is created in cups placed on the skin either by means of heat or suction. This draws up the underlying tissues, creating a rush of blood to the area – increasing circulation and localized healing takes place. Most commonly cupping is incorporated into a massage, bodywork or acupuncture session.
Cupping therapy has been further developed as a means to open the ‘meridians’ or channels of the body that flow energy to each and every organ and tissue in our bodies. For example, there are five meridians on the back that, when opened, allow invigorating energy to travel the whole length of the body. Cupping is the best way to open these meridians, and you guessed it…relieve pain!!

For a live demonstration on CBS News click here.

Cupping has also been found to affect the body up to four inches into the tissues, causing tissues to release toxins and activate the lymphatic system. This is great for common aches and pains but is also proven to clear colon blockages, help activate and clear the veins, arteries and capillaries, activate the skin, clear stretch marks and improve varicose veins. Cupping is very useful, extremely safe and can be easily learned and incorporated into your family health practices.

Cupping is an excellent and effective alternative to surgical or invasive treatment or treatment with pharmaceuticals for:
•    Body pain including but not limited to knee pain, elbow pain, back and neck pain, pain in the legs, low back pain, hand pain
•    Acute pain such as sprains and strains
•    Edema and swellings
•    Asthma and bronchitis
•    Dull aches and pains, arthritis
•    Abdominal pain, stomachache and indigestion
•    Painful menstruation and associated pain in the low back.
•    Coughs from excessive mucus

Movie stars like Cupping too. Gwyneth Paltrow showed cupping marks at a film premier that caused quite a media stir. Check out the story!!

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